Home > Tips and Advice > Starting a Homework Club

Starting a Homework Club

By: Beth Morrisey MLIS - Updated: 24 Mar 2015 | comments*Discuss
 
Starting A Homework Club

Starting a homework club can be beneficial for all involved. The children who attend the club can work together and learn from each other, while the adults (usually parents) who are involved can see where the children are struggling and learn more about the kind of learner each child is. Some schools already offer a homework club to help children study after school, but parents can also start a homework club in their community. If you are interested in starting a homework club for your children, first set some rules and regulations. Select a time and place to hold the club and then let others know about it.

Setting Homework Club Rules and Regulations

Homework clubs should be enjoyable for children, but that doesn’t mean that they should operate without some basic rules and regulations. When you are setting up your club, consider how many children you think should be involved and what ages would be most appropriate. Will you consider children from many schools or only the school your child attends? What kind of reference materials, if any, will you keep on hand to help with the children’s study? Think about how you will fund the club. Will there be a joining fee or any type of dues? What will happen if the club needs to be cancelled one day? Will you send emails or have a phone tree set up? How will all of the parents involved get to know each other? Will you have an information meeting or a meet-and-greet evening? The more you can work out about the club before you seek new members, the more confident you can feel in advertising it.

Selecting a Time and Place for a Homework Club

Once you know how you would like the homework club to run, you should determine which time and place will be best for hosting the club. Many clubs run directly after school on school grounds, but some also run later in the evening in a public library, church hall or even in member’s own homes. If you are considering a public place for the homework club then present your plan formally to the authorities in charge. Also make sure that the location’s insurance will cover any accidents or injuries to club members. If you are considering private homes, make sure that each adult involved will be comfortable with having a number of children in their home and that, again, there are no insurance issues in doing so.

Let Others Know About the Homework Club

With your rules set and your time and place decided you can begin to advertise your homework club. Let other parents and teachers know about your club and consider sending out flyers to potential members or hanging notices around schools and community locations. If your child’s school is associated with a religious organisation then you may be able to advertise through those channels as well. Make sure that you include your name and some contact information on each advertisement, and if you have specific times in which you are happy to answer questions then make those known as well. Otherwise, welcome each new inquiry but remember your initial rules and regulations when it comes to accepting new members.

Starting a homework club is one way that parents can help their children study. Parents who are considering starting a homework club should set initial rules and regulations for the club, select a time and place for the club and then let others know about the club.

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
[Add a Comment]
Thank you very much for your advice. I will get back with more update .
thuli - 24-Mar-15 @ 4:54 PM
@Thuli - you would have to approach your local authority to see what the legal requirements are and to see whether there will be Ofsted involvement. You would also need to have DBS checks in place.
eHomework - 13-Mar-15 @ 10:30 AM
Please advice what are legal requirements on need to run a homework help club for primary school children
Thuli - 11-Mar-15 @ 12:55 PM
Thank you for the information about homework clubs which is great. I am considering setting one up on a charitable basis for students in the local community. I may target or end up attracting young people who need extra help with their academic work. I agree with the approach mentioned that homework clubs should be enjoyable and involve children learning from each other. In a school setting, friends from the same class are more likely to turn up and work on the same homework together. However, if you run a club in the community, have a variety of children of different ages attending and working on different pieces of homework, how can they work together and learn from each other? Children can be very good at helping each other but wouldn't this prevent a child from completing their own work if it is different from that being completed by the child they are helping? It is easier to plan when you know what you what work will be covered. When children can turn up with any piece of homework they would like to do at any time, isn't any teaching rather "off the cuff" in style? I like multi-sensory, active, learning with discussions which may be particularly helpful if a child is having difficulties, but it is hard to factor those things in as I don't think you tend to do whole class teaching in the clubs and this style of teaching could distract other children. I would like to avoid the just sitting quietly for 2 hours, but I do not know how when children are unable to work together because they are not working on the same things.I have seen a homework club which was quiet, the children and leader were obviously close and happy in each other's company, but I am not sure how the rapport was achieved. Perhaps they knew each other outside. I love the idea of a less formal, more social atmosphere than school. However, if children cannot work together due to the factors mentioned above, how can homework clubs be very social? How can they be interactive and fun under the circumstances? Thank you for your time.
D - 11-Sep-13 @ 9:12 PM
Thank you for the information about homework clubs which is great. I am considering setting one up on a charitable basis for students in the local community. I may target or end up attracting young people who need extra help with their academic work. I agree with the approach mentioned that homework clubs should be enjoyable and involve children learning from each other. In a school setting, friends from the same class are more likely to turn up and work on the same homework together. However, if you run a club in the community, have a variety of children of different ages attending and working on different pieces of homework, how can they work together and learn from each other? Children can be very good at helping each other but wouldn't this prevent a child from completing their own work if it is different from that being completed by the child they are helping? It is easier to plan when you know what you what work will be covered. When children can turn up with any piece of homework they would like to do at any time, isn't any teaching rather "off the cuff" in style? I like multi-sensory, active, learning with discussions which may be particularly helpful if a child is having difficulties, but it is hard to factor those things in as I don't think you tend to do whole class teaching in the clubs and this style of teaching could distract other children. I would like to avoid the just sitting quietly for 2 hours, but I do not know how when children are unable to work together because they are not working on the same things.I have seen a homework club which was quiet, the children and leader were obviously close and happy in each other's company, but I am not sure how the rapport was achieved. Perhaps they knew each other outside. I love the idea of a less formal, more social atmosphere than school. However, if children cannot work together due to the factors mentioned above, how can homework clubs be very social? How can they be interactive and fun under the circumstances? Thank you for your time.
D - 11-Sep-13 @ 9:10 PM
Hi I would love to know how many visits you recieve on the subject homework clubs because I believe I might be able to help in the advertising part of when a new homework club is in need of members.
www.simplesite.com/m - 29-Aug-12 @ 12:35 AM
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice...
Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
Topics
Further Reading...
Our Most Popular...
Add to my Yahoo!
Add to Google
Stumble this
Add to Twitter
Add To Facebook
RSS feed
You should seek independent professional advice before acting upon any information on the eHomework website. Please read our Disclaimer.